reproach


reproach
re|proach1 [rıˈprəutʃ US -ˈproutʃ] n formal
[Date: 1400-1500; : Old French; Origin: reproche, from reprochier 'to reproach', from Vulgar Latin repropiare, from Latin prope 'near']
1.) [U]
criticism, blame, or disapproval
'You don't need me,' she said quietly, without reproach.
2.)
a remark that expresses criticism, blame, or disapproval
He argued that the reproaches were unfair.
3.) above/beyond reproach
impossible to criticize
= ↑perfect
His behaviour throughout this affair has been beyond reproach.
4.) a reproach to sb/sth
something that should make a person, society etc feel bad or ashamed
These derelict houses are a reproach to the city.
reproach 2
reproach2 v [T]
1.) formal to blame or criticize someone in a way that shows you are disappointed at what they have done
reproach sb for/with sth
He publicly reproached his son for his behavior.
2.) reproach yourself
to feel guilty about something that you think you are responsible for
reproach yourself for/with
You've got nothing to reproach yourself for - it was his own decision.

Dictionary of contemporary English. 2013.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Reproach — Re*proach , n. [F. reproche. See {Reproach}, v.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of reproaching; censure mingled with contempt; contumelious or opprobrious language toward any person; abusive reflections; as, severe reproach. [1913 Webster] No… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reproach — ► VERB 1) express one s disapproval of or disappointment with. 2) (reproach with) accuse of. ► NOUN ▪ an expression of disapproval or disappointment. ● above (or beyond) reproach Cf. ↑beyond reproach …   English terms dictionary

  • Reproach — Re*proach (r? pr?ch ), v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Reproached} ( pr?cht ); p. pr. & vb. n. {Reproaching}.] [F. reprocher, OF. reprochier, (assumed) LL. reproriare; L. pref. re again, against, back + prope near; hence, originally, to bring near to, throw …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • reproach — [n] strong criticism; dishonor abuse, admonishment, admonition, blame, blemish, censure, chiding, condemnation, contempt, disapproval, discredit, disgrace, disrepute, ignominy, indignity, obloquy, odium, opprobrium, rap*, rebuke, reprehension,… …   New thesaurus

  • reproach — I noun accusation, animadversion, blame, castigation, censure, chastisement, chiding, complaint, condemnation, contempt, contumelia, contumely, correction, degradation, denouncement, denunciation, derogation, disapprobation, disapproval,… …   Law dictionary

  • reproach — vb chide, admonish, *reprove, rebuke, reprimand Analogous words: *criticize, reprehend, censure, reprobate: *warn, forewarn, caution: counsel, advise (see under ADVICE) …   New Dictionary of Synonyms

  • reproach — [ri prōch′] vt. [LME reprochen < OFr reprochier < VL * repropiare < L re , back + prope, near] 1. to accuse of and blame for a fault so as to make feel ashamed; rebuke; reprove 2. Rare to bring shame and disgrace upon; be a cause of… …   English World dictionary

  • reproach — noun ADJECTIVE ▪ bitter ▪ mild ▪ There was mild reproach in his tone. PREPOSITION ▪ above reproach, beyond …   Collocations dictionary

  • reproach — I UK [rɪˈprəʊtʃ] / US [rɪˈproʊtʃ] verb [transitive] Word forms reproach : present tense I/you/we/they reproach he/she/it reproaches present participle reproaching past tense reproached past participle reproached to criticize someone and feel… …   English dictionary

  • reproach — [[t]rɪpro͟ʊtʃ[/t]] reproaches, reproaching, reproached 1) VERB If you reproach someone, you say or show that you are disappointed, upset, or angry because they have done something wrong. [V n] She is quick to reproach anyone who doesn t live up… …   English dictionary